Great Fire of 1916

WEB Fire Headline 2 | Augusta Museum of History

Headline image courtesy of the Augusta Herald (Augusta Chronicle)

On March 22, 1916, shortly after 6 p.m., a fire broke out in a shop housed in the Dyer building in downtown Augusta. The fire, fed by strong winds, burned steadily through the night and into the morning hours of March 23. Sweeping through much of downtown, the fire destroyed busineses, schools, and residences in its path. Firefighters from Augusta's five engine companies, as well as fire department crews from neighboring cities, including Atlanta, Savannah, Charleston, and Columbia, helped battle the massive fire. An area of of one-quarter square miles, or 25 blocks, was blackened during the fire. There were no deaths caused by the fire, however, many were left homeless. Property loss was estimated at $6 million.

Explore the map below to see images of the night of the fire and the aftermath from the Augusta Museum of History's collection. Each yellow camera point represents a photograph or series of photographs of the effected areas. The gray area depicts the area burned during the fire. Zoom in and out of the map to view each point. Please note, some points are an aporoximation of the effected area. 

Fire Image Strip | Augusta Museum of History

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